Nielsen Global Research

Doing Well by Doing Good (2014)
Nielsen polled 30,000 consumers in 60 countries to find out if consumers really care about conscious capitalism when it comes to buying decisions. Many companies today are making a conscious effort to put sustainable practices into action. They’re well aware that doing so not only helps the environment and society, it can also create goodwill for their reputations and contribute positively to their brands’ health and performance. But are consumers willing to pay more for products and services that come from companies that engage in actions that further some social good? Assuming a positive ratio between a stated willingness to pay and an actual willingness to open one’s wallet, the survey found that the answer is yes for a growing number of consumers around the world.

Consumers Who Care (2013)
Nielsen surveyed more than 29,000 online respondents in 58 countries to see whether companies integrating social impact into the heart of corporate strategy matters to consumers. As in 2011, the survey used stated willingness to spend more on goods and services from companies that have implemented programs to give back to society as a proxy for how much consumers care about brand investments in social impact. The results provide one simple gauge for whether consumers care—about cause marketing, shared value, conscious capitalism or other pursuits of corporate social impact—and they help to quantify the growing desire among consumers to reward those companies they view as socially responsible. Listen to a free podcast with Nielsen's Nic Covey about this report.

The Global, Socially Conscious Consumer (2011)
Findings from a Nielsen survey of more than 28,000 online respondents from 56 countries around the world provide fresh insights to help businesses better understand the right audience for cause marketers, which programs resonate most strongly with this audience, and what marketing methods may be most effective in reaching these consumers. In the study, respondents were asked if they prefer to buy products and services from companies that implement programs that give back to society.  Anticipating a positive response bias, respondents were also asked whether they would be willing to pay extra for those services. For the purposes of this study, Nielsen defines the “socially conscious consumer” as those who say they would be willing to pay the extra.